Category Archives: Photo Gallery

Why I Started Using Luminosity Masks In Photoshop

After years of using just Lightroom to process my photos, I had decided recently that I wanted to open up and increase my photo processing capabilities.

I always prefer to capture images in my photography as close as possible to how I see them, and as I had blogged recently, I had learned how to use my histogram to capture more data in my exposures.

Once all this data was captured in my exposures, I wanted to use the additional processing power of Photoshop to bring out the detail and dynamic range that I was looking for.

So what are luminosity masks?

It is a process within Photoshop that will select a precise area of a photo, based on the lighness value. Sometimes you want to zero in on a specific area of a photo, and just add adjustments to that area, without affecting anywhere else. More on this later.

So far, I am happy that I am able to bring out the light and the highlights of these landscapes, to help these photos look more like what I really saw when I was out there enjoying the scene.

This is very exciting, and I hope to capture many more photos with this technique!

Captured the NEOWISE Comet!

Had a great night in the Olympic Mountains this week, and was able to view the NEOWISE Comet, even though at first I was skeptical that my timing would be right.

After setting up my compositions, based on the predictions I had researched, the comet appeared suddenly exactly where I had hoped.

It appeared directly northwest, 2 hours after sunrise, about 20 degrees above the horizon.

It started out as a white line, then brightened up and was visible for at least the next hour.

I used exposure bracketing to capture the detail of both the comet, and the landscape in my pre-determined composition.

This was my first comet that I had captured, had a lot of fun with it!

Some fun facts:

-NEOWISE stands for Near Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the space telescope that detected it.

-On 22 July 2020, it will be the closest it will get to earth, at 64 million miles.

-The comet is traveling at 17,500 miles per hour.

-The diameter of the comet is approximately 3 miles across.

After July, it will not be seen for another 6,800 years.

Happy Hunting!

The Top 5 Reasons That I Don’t Like Top 5 Lists

All over the Internet, there are plenty of lists of the few “top” ways to do something. You know what I’m talking about.

If you were to put in a simple web search on any type of topic, it seems to always generate “Top 5 Ways” to do this, or “Top 10 Ways” to do that articles and videos.

This applies in just about any skill or passion that takes immense time and effort to be mastered.

The reason I don’t like to see these lists is simply because I see this as an easy way for people to search for “shortcuts”…….to attempt to learn all these complex skills and tasks quickly, and then attempt to rapidly benefit from them.

While this may initially appear as an efficient way to learn something, I feel that it bypasses the passion that drives us to continuously excel.

I follow quite a few blogs on here, and the articles I enjoy reading are the ones reflecting the hard work people have put into the skills, challenges, or lifestyles they have mastered.

Whether it’s obtaining and maintaining the fit lifestyle they wanted, finding and conquering the trails they’ve always dreamed of exploring, facing the every day challenges of keeping up with writing, or trying to simply increase skills in photography so they can take better pictures (that’s me!), these articles are the most motivating to me.

I don’t enjoy seeing articles that just list these briefly summarized lists on how to do a particular craft, I feel that they just inspire us to take shortcuts so we can obtain quick results.

To me, it just feel genuine to see those of you who have spent the time and learned the research, skills, or experience to become good at something you are passionate about.

When I research something online, I have been finding myself just scrolling past the Top 5 or Top 10 lists, and spending time researching the actual principles of the skill, learning the mechanics, and coming up with my own conclusion of how to apply it to my craft.

In the meantime, please keep posting the articles that reflect the hard work and tough lessons you may have learned in your quest for your passion….I will read through these over an abbreviated Top 5 shortcut list any day!

May The Fourth Be With You!

DISCLAIMER: Yes, these are Photoshopped.

Happy Star Wars Day!

I normally post my blogs on Tuesdays, but doing it a day early this week for this awesome day.

Here are some of my favorite hiking locations from Washington State, with some objects I had placed from the amazing Star Wars universe.

Please let me know which one is your favorite in the comments!

Feel free to share with any Star Wars fans in your galaxy!

So I Stopped Posting My Hikes to Social Media….and Here is What I Discovered

Some locations such as this peaceful ridge can be found while out exploring, and these amazing locations are meant to be discovered, not overrun by the masses.

You know it, and I know it…..social media is negatively impacting the land that we love, and it’s only getting worse.

The pristine areas we all know and value are being trampled….droves of visitors are coming to these areas, and we all can clearly see signs that the ecosystem cannot handle it.

Obviously, it is largely in part because the wilderness environment is no longer being respected like it should be by its visitors.

Why is this?

There has been a shift, and more often than not, now the waves of visitors to the wilderness are NOT coming out there to experience and appreciate it. They are often coming out there to obtain that perfect photo and obtain that experience strictly so they can share it on their social media accounts, their friends and strangers see it, and the cycle repeats.

Why else are trails being littered, meadows being trampled, natural features being damaged due to photo ops, and social media tags being etched into historical relics?

As I had mentioned in an earlier blog, as I began my hiking and photography hobby, I would routinely post all of my hikes and landscape photos on social media like everyone else.

On the surface, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this.

The main idea behind social media was for us to keep in touch with distant family and friends, and so we can have a network of friends that we can share ideas and our adventures in life with.

Unfortunately, social media has evolved into the sharing of our photos and newly discovered hiking locations to literally tens of thousands of complete strangers.

The social media sites actually want this, since web traffic drives up their revenue from advertising, and this is precisely why they created the like and heart buttons, and made sharing buttons incredibly easy to use. When we get likes and comments on our posts, it gives us a boost of dopamine, and therefore fuels the need to share to even more droves of strangers.

So when you think of this overwhelming internet traffic being directed to our treasured hiking trails and pristine photography locations, it has, at least to me, become very discouraging.

So I had decided to stop using social media for the reason of sharing my hiking locations and pictures, especially to the hiking and photography groups with overwhelming member numbers.

When I do share a new hiking location or photography spot to a friend, its usually while doing a another hike together, or even over a cold beer. This is also much more personable and rewarding to me, and I feel good knowing that they may have one more great adventure to add to their list, and so do I.

This hidden spot was found off trail, and shared to me by a close friend during a hike. It is much more rewarding to discover these spots this way, rather than just rushing straight there after been given GPS coordinates to it.

So what is this discovery that I had mentioned?

As a result of this, I actually find that I appreciate these amazing adventures to these great spots even more. I see these places more as sacred, but I am far from being selfish and keeping them all to myself. I am still talking about these amazing discoveries with people whom I know will respect these places, but I am no longer sharing them to the endless wave of strangers.

It is a small step, but I at least feel really good that I am no longer contributing to the depreciation of these amazing places.

John Muir would have wanted it this way.